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Posts Tagged ‘Firmus’

Florea

Time for some more name inspiration from Latin.

These are the gems that F has to offer — and words which sound delightful but leave much to be desired in their meaning!

  • Faba — “broad bean” (the word behind names such as Fabia and Fabian)
  • Fabella — “little story”
  • FaberFabra — “skillful,” “ingenious”; as a noun, it means “smith” and “craftsperson”
  • Fabula — “talk,” “story,” “fable”
  • Fabularis — “mythical”
  • Fabulosus, Fabulosa — “fabled”
  • Facetus, Faceta — “fine,” “elegant,” “witty”
  • Faeneus, Faenea — “made of hay”
  • Fagus — “beech-tree”
  • Falco — “falcon”
  • Falx — “sickle”
  • Fama — “talk,” “rumor,” “fame” — personified as a the Goddess Fama — by the Romans
  • Famosus, Famosa — “famous”
  • Far — “spelt”
  • Farina — “flour”
  • Farreus, Farrea — “made of spelt”
  • Fas — “divine law”
  • Fautrix — “patroness”
  • Favilla — “glowing ashes,” “spark”
  • Favus — “honeycomb”
  • Fax — “torch,” “firebrand,” “flame,” “light”
  • Femella — “young woman,” “girl”
  • Ferax — “fruitful,” “fertile,” “prolific”
  • Feriae — “festivals”
  • Ferinus, Ferina — “wild”
  • Feritas — “wilderness”
  • Fero — “I bear,” “I produce,” “I bring,” etc
  • Ferox — “fierce,” “courageous,” “wild”
  • Ferula — “fennel”
  • Ferus, Fera — “wild”
  • Festinatio — “speed”
  • Festinus, Festina — “hurrying”
  • Festivus, Festiva — “festive,” “merry”
  • Festus, Festa — “festive”
  • Fidelia — “earthenware pot”
  • Fidelis — “faithful”
  • Fidentia — “confidence,” “boldness”
  • Fides — “trust,” “confidence,” “belief,” “faith”; “lyre,” “lute,” “harp”
  • Fidicen, Fidicina — “harp/lute/lyre-player,” “lyric poet”
  • Filia — “daughter”
  • Filius — “son”
  • Filix — “fern”
  • Finis — “boundary,” “limit,” “end,” “summit”
  • Firmus, Firma — “firm,” “strong”
  • Flagrantia — “burning,” “blazing,” “glittering”
  • Flamen — “priest”; “blowing,” “blast”
  • Flamma — “flame”
  • Flavens — “yellow/gold-colored”
  • Flavus, Flava — “golden-yellow” (the adjective behind the name Flavia, etc)
  • Flexus — “bending,” “turning,” “modulation”
  • Floreus, Florea — “made of flowers”
  • Florifer, Florifera — “bearing flowers”
  • Flos — “flower”
  • Flumen — “stream”
  • Fons — “spring,” “fountain”
  • Forma — “form,” “figure,” “manner,” “beauty”
  • Formosus, Formosa — “beautiful”
  • Fortuna — “fate,” “luck,” “fortune”
  • Frater — “brother”
  • Fraxineus, Fraxinea — “of ash-wood”
  • Fraxinus — “ash-tree”
  • Frons — “leaf,” “foliage”
  • Frugifer, Frugifera — “fruit-bearing”
  • Fulgor — “lightning”
  • Fulgur — “flash of lightning”
  • Fulmen — “lightning”
  • Fulmineus, Fulminea — “of lightning,” “like lightning”
  • Fulvus, Fulva — “tawny yellow” (the adjective behind the name Fulvia, etc)
  • Furvus, Furva — “dark,” “black”

And the loathlies:

  • Fallax — “treacherous”
  • Fallo — “I deceive”
  • Fames — “hunger”
  • Fastus — “pride,” “arrogance”
  • Febris — “fever”
  • Fel — “gallbladder,” “bitterness”
  • Ferreus, Ferrea — “like iron,” “unfeeling,” “cruel,” “unyielding”
  • Fessus, Fessa — “tired,” “exhausted”
  • Fleo — “I weep”
  • Foedus, Foeda — “filthy,” “horrible”
  • Fossa — “ditch”
  • Fraus — “deceit,” “delusion,” “crime”
  • Frivolus, Frivola — “worthless”
  • Furax — “thievish”
  • Furcifer — “gallows-bird,” “scoundrel”

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Terentius Neo and his wife

Today marks the anniversary of the start of the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE which destroyed the Roman town of Pompeii.

It was, coincidentally, the day after the Vulcanalia — the Roman festival dedicated to the fire and smith God Vulcan.

The 24th itself was a festival in honor of both Luna — Goddess of the Moon — and Mania, Goddess of Death.

We know the names of many of the people who lived in Pompeii — and nearby Herculaneum, which was also devastated.

In memory of all those who died, below are some of the names of Roman men and women whose names were preserved in the ruins of Pompeii.

Their fates are unknown.

  • Acilius CedrusCedrus is the Latin for ‘cedar'; it is actually a feminine noun, but was clearly used here as a surname.
  • Aemilius CrescensAemilius is the source of the French Emile and English Emilia and Emily — among others. Crescens ‘growing’ and ‘thriving’ was a common surname, and there are other examples known from Pompeii. The standard feminine is Crescentina.
  • Arrius StephanusStephanus is the Greek for ‘garland’ and ‘crown’. The source of English Stephen, it was a common Greek name. Arrius Stephanus was probably a Greek slave freed by a member of the Arrius family.
  • Betutius Placidus, LuciusPlacidus — Latin for ‘gentle’, ‘calm’ and ‘mild’.
  • Biria
  • Caecilius Capella, LuciusCapella means ‘little goat’, and is another feminine noun used as a male surname! Best known today as the name of a star in Auriga.
  • Caecilius Iucundus, Lucius — famous to anyone who ever learned Latin with the Cambridge Latin Course (or has seen The Fires of Pompeii — an episode of Doctor Who). Caecilius is the origin of Cecil, Cecilia, Cecily and Cicely.
  • Caetronius Eutychus, GnaeusEutychus is another Greek name, and this fellow was probably another freed slave. From the Greek eutukhês ‘fortunate’ and ‘prosperous’. A character of the name turns up in the New Testament.
  • Calavia OptataOptata means ‘wished for’, ‘longed for’ and ‘welcome’, and more than one example is known from Pompeii
  • Caprasia
  • Caprasius FelixFelix ‘fortunate’ was a very common Roman surname.
  • Casellius Marcellus, MarcusMarcellus means simply ‘little Marcus’. It was another common surname, most famously borne by the very aristocratic Marcus Claudius Marcellus, the first husband of Augustus’ daughter Julia.
  • Cassia
  • Chlorus — a surname from the Greek khlôros ‘greenish-yellow’.
  • Cornelius Amandus, Lucius
  • Cosmus — another surname, this time from Greek kosmos ‘order'; source of the name Cosmo.
  • Junius Proculus, DeciusDecius is probably a ‘modern’ mistake for Decimus (as Shakespeare made in Julius Caesar), but the original source is lost. Proculus was another well-used surname, a diminutive form of procus ‘wooer’ and ‘suitor’.
  • Demetrius — a Greek name meaning ‘belonging to (the Goddess) Demeter. Source of Dmitri and (ultimately) Demi.
  • Dentatius Panthera, TitusPanthera is the Latin for ‘panther’.
  • Epaphra — short form of Greek Epaphrodita from epaphroditos ‘lovely’ and ‘charming’.
  • Epidia
  • Epidius FortunatusFortunatus means ‘prosperous’, ‘happy’, ‘lucky’. Another popular surname.
  • Equitia
  • Erastus — Greek ‘beloved’ and ‘lovely’.
  • Euplia — possibly from the Greek euploia ‘fair voyage’
  • Fabia — the Fabii were a very important family, though most bearers descended from former slaves and other dependents.
  • Fabius Celer, MarcusCeler was another popular Roman surname meaning ‘swift’.
  • Fabius Memor, MarcusMemor means ‘mindful’ and ‘remembering’
  • Faventinus — from favens ‘favoring’ and ‘befriending’.
  • Fortunata
  • Fufidius Successus, NumeriusNumerius is one of the rarer Roman first names.
  • Gavius RufusRufus ‘red’ and ‘ruddy’ was one of the commonest Roman surnames.
  • Grata Metallica — yes, Metallica (I wonder if the Swedish family who fought to call their daughter Metallica knew it was used as a given name in Roman times?). From metallicus ‘of metal’ and ‘metallic'; ‘mine-worker’.
  • Helpis Afra — Greek elpis ‘hope'; Afer ‘African’.
  • Hirtia Psacas — Greek psakas ‘drop of rain’, grain’ and ‘morsel’.
  • Julius Nicephorus, GaiusNicephorus is Greek, meaning ‘bearing victory’
  • Livius Firmus, LuciusFirmus was another common surname, meaning ‘strong’, ‘steadfast’ and ‘powerful’
  • Loreius Tiburtinus
  • Lucretius Fronto, Marcus
  • Lusoria
  • Mestrius Maximus, QuintusMaximus needs little intro — Latin ‘greatest’. Not uncommon.
  • Numicia PrimigeniaPrimigenia means ‘primal'; it was an epithet of the Goddess Fortuna.
  • Numisius Rarus, LuciusRarus ‘thin’ and ‘rare’.
  • Nymphius — a family name of Greek origin, from numphê ‘nymph’ and ‘bride’.
  • Octavius RomulusRomulus was one of the legendary founders of Rome.
  • Oppia
  • Oppius GratusGratus, another surname, meaning ‘beloved’, ‘dear’ and ‘agreeable’.
  • Paccia
  • Paccius Clarus, PubliusClarus ‘clear’, ‘bright’ and ‘shining’. Source of Clara and Clare.
  • Pinarius CerealisCerealis ‘belonging to (the Goddess) Ceres’.
  • Plotilla
  • Pomaria
  • Popidius Metallicus
  • Poppaeus SabinusSabinus ‘Sabine’, source of Sabin and Sabina. The emperor Nero’s second wife was called Poppaea Sabina, and had property near Pompeii
  • Primilla — feminine diminutive of primus ‘first’.
  • Pupius, Marcus
  • Salvius — another family name familiar to anyone who has done the Cambridge Latin Course. From salvus ‘safe’ and ‘sound’.
  • Sextilius VerusVerus, another popular Roman surname — ‘true’, ‘real’, ‘genuine’.
  • Sibilla Pompeiana
  • Spurius Saturninus, MarcusSaturninus, Roman surname meaning ‘belonging to (the God) Saturn’
  • Suettius ElainusElainus is a surname of Greek origin, from elainos ‘of olive-wood’
  • Sutoria Primigenia
  • Terentius Neo, TitusNeo — from the Greek neos ‘new’… so Neo is not so ‘new’ as a name as some folk may think!
  • Tettius Faustus, GaiusFaustus, another common surname meaning ‘of favorable omen’, ‘auspicious’. The origin, obviously, of Faust.
  • Trebius Valens, AulusValens, yet another of the most common surnames, valens means ‘strong’, ‘healthy’ and ‘powerful’ and is the source of Valentine and Valentina.
  • Vedius VestalisVestalis, a surname meaning ‘belonging to (the Goddess) Vesta’.

All names included here have been ordered their family (gens) name (where known). Not all first names (praenomina) or surnames (cognomina) are known.

In the Roman system of naming, male citizens usually had three names: a first name (praenomen) — of which there were only a few in common use — the name of their gens ‘family’ or ‘clan’ (nomen), and their surname (cognomen).

Women were mostly known by the feminine form of their family/clan name, or the feminine form of a surname. But sometimes they bore both, or two family names, or two surnames.

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