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Posts Tagged ‘Faber’

Florea

Time for some more name inspiration from Latin.

These are the gems that F has to offer — and words which sound delightful but leave much to be desired in their meaning!

  • Faba — “broad bean” (the word behind names such as Fabia and Fabian)
  • Fabella — “little story”
  • FaberFabra — “skillful,” “ingenious”; as a noun, it means “smith” and “craftsperson”
  • Fabula — “talk,” “story,” “fable”
  • Fabularis — “mythical”
  • Fabulosus, Fabulosa — “fabled”
  • Facetus, Faceta — “fine,” “elegant,” “witty”
  • Faeneus, Faenea — “made of hay”
  • Fagus — “beech-tree”
  • Falco — “falcon”
  • Falx — “sickle”
  • Fama — “talk,” “rumor,” “fame” — personified as a the Goddess Fama — by the Romans
  • Famosus, Famosa — “famous”
  • Far — “spelt”
  • Farina — “flour”
  • Farreus, Farrea — “made of spelt”
  • Fas — “divine law”
  • Fautrix — “patroness”
  • Favilla — “glowing ashes,” “spark”
  • Favus — “honeycomb”
  • Fax — “torch,” “firebrand,” “flame,” “light”
  • Femella — “young woman,” “girl”
  • Ferax — “fruitful,” “fertile,” “prolific”
  • Feriae — “festivals”
  • Ferinus, Ferina — “wild”
  • Feritas — “wilderness”
  • Fero — “I bear,” “I produce,” “I bring,” etc
  • Ferox — “fierce,” “courageous,” “wild”
  • Ferula — “fennel”
  • Ferus, Fera — “wild”
  • Festinatio — “speed”
  • Festinus, Festina — “hurrying”
  • Festivus, Festiva — “festive,” “merry”
  • Festus, Festa — “festive”
  • Fidelia — “earthenware pot”
  • Fidelis — “faithful”
  • Fidentia — “confidence,” “boldness”
  • Fides — “trust,” “confidence,” “belief,” “faith”; “lyre,” “lute,” “harp”
  • Fidicen, Fidicina — “harp/lute/lyre-player,” “lyric poet”
  • Filia — “daughter”
  • Filius — “son”
  • Filix — “fern”
  • Finis — “boundary,” “limit,” “end,” “summit”
  • Firmus, Firma — “firm,” “strong”
  • Flagrantia — “burning,” “blazing,” “glittering”
  • Flamen — “priest”; “blowing,” “blast”
  • Flamma — “flame”
  • Flavens — “yellow/gold-colored”
  • Flavus, Flava — “golden-yellow” (the adjective behind the name Flavia, etc)
  • Flexus — “bending,” “turning,” “modulation”
  • Floreus, Florea — “made of flowers”
  • Florifer, Florifera — “bearing flowers”
  • Flos — “flower”
  • Flumen — “stream”
  • Fons — “spring,” “fountain”
  • Forma — “form,” “figure,” “manner,” “beauty”
  • Formosus, Formosa — “beautiful”
  • Fortuna — “fate,” “luck,” “fortune”
  • Frater — “brother”
  • Fraxineus, Fraxinea — “of ash-wood”
  • Fraxinus — “ash-tree”
  • Frons — “leaf,” “foliage”
  • Frugifer, Frugifera — “fruit-bearing”
  • Fulgor — “lightning”
  • Fulgur — “flash of lightning”
  • Fulmen — “lightning”
  • Fulmineus, Fulminea — “of lightning,” “like lightning”
  • Fulvus, Fulva — “tawny yellow” (the adjective behind the name Fulvia, etc)
  • Furvus, Furva — “dark,” “black”

And the loathlies:

  • Fallax — “treacherous”
  • Fallo — “I deceive”
  • Fames — “hunger”
  • Fastus — “pride,” “arrogance”
  • Febris — “fever”
  • Fel — “gallbladder,” “bitterness”
  • Ferreus, Ferrea — “like iron,” “unfeeling,” “cruel,” “unyielding”
  • Fessus, Fessa — “tired,” “exhausted”
  • Fleo — “I weep”
  • Foedus, Foeda — “filthy,” “horrible”
  • Fossa — “ditch”
  • Fraus — “deceit,” “delusion,” “crime”
  • Frivolus, Frivola — “worthless”
  • Furax — “thievish”
  • Furcifer — “gallows-bird,” “scoundrel”

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Our journey through lesser known and used surnames of Old English, Anglo-Norman and Norse origin continues today with a look at F.

Sir Thomas 'Black Tom' Fairfax, an important figure in the English Civil War.

  • Faber — actually Latin, this one! faber ‘smith’. There is evidence it was used as a personal name in the Middle Ages.
  • Fainer — Old French fenier ‘haymonger’.
  • Fairfax — Old English fæger ‘fair’ + feax ‘hair’.
  • Fairlock — Old English fæger ‘fair’ + locc ‘lock (of hair)’.
  • Fairwyn — from an unattested Old English personal name Fægerwine ‘fair-friend’.
  • Fane, Fayne — Old English fægen ‘glad’, ‘well-disposed’. Found as a given name in the Middle Ages as well as a byname.
  • Farley — from one of the places of the name. Old English fearn ‘fern’ + lēah ‘wood’, ‘woodland clearing’, ‘glade’, ‘pasture’ and ‘meadow’.
  • Farlow — from Farlow, Shropshire. Old English fearn ‘fearn’ + hlāw ‘tumulus’, ‘mound’, ‘hill’.
  • Farndon — from one of the places of the name. Old English fearn ‘fern’ + dūn ‘hill’. Var: Farnden.
  • Farnham — from oneo f the places of the name. Old English fearn ‘fern’ + hām ‘homestead’, ‘village’, ‘manor’, ‘estate’, or hamm ‘enclosure’, ‘river-meadow’.
  • Farrand, Ference — either the medieval personal name Ferrant, the Old French form of Ferdinand, or Old French ferrant ‘iron-grey’.
  • Farrar, Farrer, Faro,, Farrow, Ferrer — from Old French ferreor ‘worker in iron’. Janet Farrar is one of the world’s most influential Wiccans.
  • Farren — Old English fægen ‘fair’ or fearr ‘bull’ + hine ‘servant’.
  • Fastolf — from the Old Norse personal name Fastúlfr. Old Norse: fastr ‘firm’ and ‘fast’ + úlfr ‘wolf’.
  • Faure — A Provencal form of Old French fevre ‘smith’.
  • Favelle — Old French fauvel ‘tawny, ‘fallow-colored’. Var: Favel, Favell.
  • Fawkes –From the Norman French personal name Falco. Old German: falco ‘falcon’. Famously borne by Gunpowder Plot Guy Fawkes and Fawkes the Phoenix in Harry Potter.
  • Fayer, Fayre — Old English fæger ‘fair’.
  • Fenby — from Ashby cum Fenby, Lincolnshire. Old English fenn ‘fen’ + Old Norse ‘farmstead’, ‘settlement’ and ‘village’.
  • Fernley — from one of the places of the name. Old English fearn ‘fern’ + lēah ‘wood’, ‘woodland clearing’, ‘glade’, ‘pasture’ and ‘meadow’. Also Farnley, Fearnley.
  • Feron — Old French feron ‘smith’.
  • Finnemore — Old French fin amour ‘dear love’.
  • Flaxley — from Flaxley, Gloucestershire. Old English fleax ‘flax’ + lēah ‘wood’, ‘woodland clearing’, ‘glade’, ‘pasture’ and ‘meadow’.
  • Flexer — from Old English fleax ‘flax’, used of someone who dressed or sold flax.
  • Flinders — form of Flanders, a historic region which now straddles the France-Belgium border. From the Old German flauma ‘flooded area’. Matilda of Flanders was the wife of King William I, while (William Matthew) Flinders Petrie was a British archaeologist.
  • Flory — partly from Fleury in France, and partly from the medieval girl’s name Floria, from Latin flos ‘flower’.  Also Florey, and Fleury.
  • Foxley — from one of the places called Foxley. Old English fox ‘fox’ + lēah ‘wood’, ‘woodland clearing’, ‘glade’, ‘pasture’ and ‘meadow’.
  • Foxton — from one of the places called Foxton. Old English fox ‘fox’ + tūn ‘enclosure’, ‘farmstead’, ‘village’, ‘manor’ and ‘estate’.
  • Foy — from Old French foi ‘faith’. Foy popped into the top 1000 in the US now and again in the late 19th and early 20th Century, but has been little seen since.
  • Frankham — Old French franc ‘free’ + homme ‘man’.
  • Frankley — from one of the places called Frankton. Personal name Franca ‘a Frank’ + tūn ‘enclosure’, ‘farmstead’, ‘village’, ‘manor’ and ‘estate’.
  • Frayne — from Old French fraisne ‘ash-tree’. Var: Frane, Frayn, Freyne.
  • Freer — from Old French frere ‘brother’ and ‘friar’.

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